Fathima Wakeel, PhD, MPH Postdoctoral Trainee - UW Obstetrics and Gynecology, Madison WI

Fathima Wakeel, PhD, MPH
Postdoctoral Trainee

310 Midvale
310 North Midvale Blvd
Madison, WI 53705

Education
PhD – University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Public Health
MPH – University of South Florida (USF) School of Public Health
BA in Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences, emphasis on Chemistry- University of South Florida (USF)

Research Area/s
General areas of interest: Maternal and child health; women’s mental health, life-course perspective
Specific areas of interest: maternal stress, personal capital, and resiliency during pregnancy and over the life course; adverse obstetric outcomes; maternal mental health over the lifecourse; racial and ethnic disparities in maternal and child health outcomes.

Highlights in your Career
Working with Dr. Michael C. Lu (my doctoral advisor) and obtaining an in-depth understanding of the lifecourse approach when examining the determinants of adverse obstetric outcomes; Being able to participate in the formative stages of the development of the 2007 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby Study; My current work with Dr. Whitney Witt and her Lifecourse Epidemiology and Family Health (LEAF) research group on some innovative and exciting research projects

Personal Passion/s
I have lived in four different countries and four different US states. I love traveling and learning about new communities and cultures. It has helped me widen my perspective on public health (specifically maternal and child health) issues, especially in terms of thinking of ways to reduce disparities in health.

What I expect to gain by being a scholar for the Center for Women’s Health and Health Disparities.
I hope to continue my work on maternal stress and personal capital as they impact obstetric outcomes. I also hope to gain a deeper understanding of some of the upstream, lifecourse determinants of maternal stress and personal capital in an effort to further explore ways to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in adverse obstetric outcomes.